September 6, 2012

Southern Utah Night Life

 

Cedar Breaks, America in Lights

Cedar Breaks, America in Lights

Cedar Breaks National Park, just under two hours away from the Best Western Coral Hills, has spectacular views, both in the day and nighttime.

Due to its high elevation and remote location, Cedar Breaks has one of the darkest night skies in the country. However, this often overlooked natural resource is in danger of being completely lost as increased light pollution from nearby cities obscures the stars. Instead of a deep black expanse punctuated by the brilliant pinpoints of stars and the iridescent glow of the Milky Way, light pollution reduces the night sky to a faintly orange haze.

Light pollution has become so prevalent in urban areas that it’s becoming difficult to remember what the night sky is supposed to look like. For example, after a 1994 earthquake knocked the power out in Los Angeles, emergency centers received numerous calls from anxious residents regarding a strange, silvery cloud in the sky. They didn’t realize they were looking at their own galaxy. National Parks and Monuments are one of the few remaining places where the wonders of the night sky can still be seen. In fact, two-thirds of the people in the United States will never see the Milky Way unless they travel to remote places like National Parks.