October 2, 2013

National Park Closures

2013-09-12 18.47.21

Highway 9 through Zion National Park is still open

National Park Closures

DON’T PANIC and don’t cancel your plans!  There is still a lot to do and see in southern Utah.  INCLUDING seeing a portion of Zion and Bryce National Parks

Yes, it is true National Parks across the country are officially closed.  However, talk to the locals and you will find there are well traveled locations to overlook into the parks that are still viewable for the general public.

There is still A LOT to do and see in southern Utah!

 

ZION NATIONAL PARK:  Highway 9 through ZION NATIONAL PARK is still open which provides views to many of the popular park features including the mile long tunnel and Checkerboard Mesa.  Also open is the giant screen movie Treasure of the Gods which presents grand views of Zion’s not readily accessible from the general areas.

CEDAR BREAKS, is the road through Cedar Breaks, also open and the views are accessible, but all buildings will be closed and unmanned.

SNOW CANYON STATE PARK, 20 minutes outside of St George, is a great spot to visit as well.

BYRCE CANYON NATIONL PARK: Best Western Ruby’s Inn offers a private shuttle and viewing location into Bryce Canyon.  Southern Utah also has several historic sites, and ghost towns worth checking out.

We recommend calling a Best Western close to each National Park to find out what additional attractions there are to visit in each area.  There are known outlooks that give access into the parks.  Those still make a trip worthwhile.

SNOW CANYON STATE PARK, St. George, BW Coral Hills 800-542-7733

ZION NP: BW Zion Park Inn 800-934-7275

BRYCE NP: BW RUBY’S INN: 435-834-5341, BW PLUS Grand Hotel: 435-834-5700

CEDAR BREAKS: BW El Rey Inn & Suites: 435-586-6518, BW Town & Country 435-586-9900

August 23, 2013

FREE Admision to the Grand Canyon and all National Parks

FREE Admission to the Grand Canyon this Sunday, August 25th 2013.  In celebration of the National Park Service’s 97th birthday, all 401 national parks across the country, including will waive entrance fees on Sunday.

 

Grand Canyon Aerial View

Grand Canyon Aerial View, Photograph by David Edwards
National Geographic

FREE Admission to all National Parks,  Read more about Founders Day of the National Parks Service courtesy of St. George News.

 

Administrative History

Although first afforded Federal protection in 1893 as a Forest Reserve and later as a National Monument, Grand Canyon did not achieve National Park status until 1919, three years after the creation of the National Park Service. Today Grand Canyon National Park receives close to five million visitors each year – a far cry from the annual visitation of 44,173 which the park received in 1919.

This link takes you to the Administrative History of Grand Canyon National Park, a political and economic history of the park from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present.